Children’s Book By Robbie Robertson Introduces Kids To Music Giants

How YouTube and music companies reach Generation C

“There are surprisingly few venues in the area, especially in Takoma Park, which has always had a big music culture,” said Danny Wells, the restaurant’s chef and partner who grew up in the area and lives nearby. “Takoma Park misses having that in the community.” Republic, which is still under construction at 6937-6939 Laurel Ave.,will have two spaces suitable for hosting local bands: A front window for smaller acts, and a larger back patio with a garage door that opens the space up to the rest of the bar and restaurant. Wells is waiting until the space is a little more finished to test the acoustics, which will determine the types of bands that he’ll be able to accommodate.He’s working with the nearby House of Musical Traditions to identify bands that would be a good fit. Republic is designed with the preferences of Takoma Park in mind, Wells said, down to the name: Given the neighborhood’s independent streak, locals have long called the it ” the Republic of Takoma Park .” That means a wide selection of vegetarian dishes to appeal to the neighborhood’s meatless eaters, as well as a raw bar, which is what people expect of the seafood-focused Black Restaurant Group, which also owns Pearl Dive and BlackSalt , among other restaurants. Wells also plans to have elevated bar food for late-night concertgoers. “It’s going to be a step up from what most people get when they go listen to music,” he said. The restaurant, which will seat 70 plus an additional 20 on the patio, is being decorated in what Wells called “Takoma style,” a manner of decor that is “hard to put into words.””It’s a unique community,” he said. “It’s offbeat and eclectic and our design intent follows that vein.” Maura Judkis is a reporter for the Weekend section and the Going Out Guide. Some of her other publications have included U.S. News & World Report, TBD.com, ARTnews, the Washington City Paper and the Onion A.V. Club. Follow her on Twitter . The Post Most:Entertainment

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(Tundra Books / October 15, 2013) By Randy Lewis October 16, 2013, 6:00 a.m. A new book from the Bands lead guitarist and songwriter Robbie Robertson, Legends, Icons & Rebels: Music That Changed the World (Tundra Books, $35), is impressive both for the concisely illuminating text and richly evocative illustrations, both of which are designed to help entice young people into the world of influential pop music. But on a level few kids will be aware of, much less appreciate, its equally if not more imposing for the accompanying double-CD set featuring tracks from each of the 27 profiled artists, a broad range of heavy hitters including the Beatles, Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, the Beach Boys, Hank Williams, Sam Cooke and others. It’s a roster that likely would have been impossible to assemble for anyone less widely esteemed than Robertson, who is also a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member. In fact, it was no picnic for him and his collaborators either. Comparing the challenges of choosing artists, determining what to say about each and finding fitting illustrations to accompany the text versus licensing the music, the music was way, way harder — and more unpredictable, said talent manager Jim Guerinot, who developed the book with Robertson and his son Sebastian along with Robertsons manager, Jared Levine. According to the book’s introduction by Robertson, the project began when his son was working part time at a childrens recreation and learning center, and noticed that they didnt respond to the average, pandering childrens music near as much as they did to really good songs performed by great artists. So the quartet of lifelong music aficionados began to work together to create a book that could introduce and inform kids about artists whose music has shaped the world around them. The list of those included stretches back as far as jazz innovator Louis Armstrong and journeys from jazz (Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald) to Great American Songbook pop (Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole), primal rock (Presley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard) to R&B and soul (Ray Charles, James Brown, Curtis Mayfield) to country (Williams, Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline) to classic rock (Dylan, Carole King) and reggae (Bob Marley). The connective thread, beyond the essential quality of the chosen recordings, was focusing on music created by those Robertson refers to as the original risk takers, extremely unique, and tremendously influential to future generations. The 128-page books descriptions of the artists, while short and to the point, is colorfully revealing. Ray Charles, for instance, redefined rhythm and blues with his personal brand of high-energy ultra-groove, a comment complemented by a quote from Frank Sinatra saying Ray Charles is the only real genius in the business. Of Joni Mitchell, whom Robertson famously backed on her recording of Raised on Robbery, the book states, Rather than focusing on political and social issues like traditional folk artists such as Woody Guthrie, Joni wanted to tell stories that spoke to personal, human truths and her songs revealed quite a bit about her life. Her romances, her neighbors, and the daughter she had to give up for adoption all found their way into her songs. The tracks selected for each artist, not surprisingly, are kid-friendly choices including the Beatles Here Comes the Sun, Cashs Get Rhythm, Mitchells The Circle Game, Billie Holidays Lets Call the Whole Thing Off and Marleys Rebel Music. The illustrations were created by 15 different artists. All four authors will appear at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, at the Barnes & Noble store at the Grove, 189 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles. Robertson also will be a guest on Tavis Smiley’s show Wednesday, Oct.

For the record company, the value of the music video is largely promotional, much like traditional radio. Although YouTube doesn’t sell music, it can expose a song to its 1 billion monthly users. If the song is a hit, some portion of the viewers will spring for a download from iTunes , Amazon.com or a similar service. And even if they don’t buy the song, YouTube and the record company share in the revenue from ads that accompany the video. The idea for the collaboration was hatched at a dinner last March attended by executives of Warner Music and YouTube, a unit of Google Inc., who were attending the South by Southwest music and media conference in Austin, Texas. Warner Music executives were looking for ways to reach consumers known as Generation C a term Google uses to describe people ages 18 to 34 who watch online video, visit social networks and blogs and use tablets and smartphones. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll “We were trying to figure out this new concept of how to reach Generation C, how we connect with fans on a much deeper level,” said Jeremy M. Holley, Warner Music Nashville’s senior vice president of consumer marketing. Working in partnership with YouTube, Warner Music embarked on a rare musical joint venture between its recording artists and the musicians who have cultivated their fan bases on the site. Warner contacted seven YouTube creators whose musical styles were compatible with those of Warner Music Nashville/Atlantic Records singer-songwriter Hayes and Atlantic Records artist Mraz. It invited Tyler Ward, Kina Grannis, Peter Hollens and other YouTube notables to record cover versions of “Everybody’s Got Somebody but Me,” which were incorporated into the original song to produce a new track. The resulting musical collaboration served as the sound track for a music video, “The Hunter Hayes YouTube Orchestra featuring Jason Mraz,” which debuts exclusively on YouTube, before the anticipated release of the official music video this month.