Low Fast-food Wages Come At High Public Cost, Reports Say

Still, the woman said she is struggling to put food on the table. Some told CNN they were living paycheck to paycheck. “The biggest thing (people are feeling) is fear,” said Hahn. “Even a lot of federal employees who know that they’re going to get their checks made up, they’re still going to be shy” if they miss a couple of pay periods. President Barack Obama visited a food pantry in downtown Washington on Monday where he helped make peanut butter sandwiches. He told reporters that he stopped by Martha’s Table because many of volunteers there had been furloughed. “They’re here contributing and giving back to the community and I think that shows the kind of spirit that we have among all kinds of federal workers all across the country, people who dedicate their lives to public service,” Obama said. Hahn, who has worked for Chesapeake Church for 20 years, said many of the men and women he saw collect food on Monday were new faces who had never sought their help in the past. While a study by Main Street showed that Calvert County was the 13th wealthiest county in the United States in 2012, Hahn said that ranking doesn’t show how many “working poor” live in the area. “It’s a damn shame,” Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley told CNN. “It’s no fault of their own, but they find themselves now in a position of, of having to come here for help.” O’Malley, who attended the event, said he would recommend that “those who for ideological reasons feel shutting down our government is a good idea” should “come here and see the families that are showing up for help to feed their families for the first time in their lives.” As volunteers passed out food, there was obvious frustration with political leaders in Washington.

Top food blogs of 2013

This is obviously nothing new (as anyone who used to have a Xanga account can tell you), but the fact alone that anyone, anywhere, can set up a platform and instantly reach millions of readers is one worth celebrating. So for the fourth year running, were ranking the top 25 food-oriented blogs, ranked according to readership and social media following. Theres plenty of time to argue the merits of what makes a food blog great, be it the amount of breaking news, quality of the recipes, layout, industry usefulness, or wide appeal, but for todays (and previous years) purposes, we took a very objective approach: we tracked down nearly 200 leading food blogs, using “best-of” lists from sites including Saveur and Babble, and then compiled four data points on each of them: the average number of monthly visitors for the past year (using Compete.coms data), and the number of Twitter followers, Facebook fans, and Pinterest followers. To arrive at the final 25, we factored in the number of average unique visitors (this accounted for 50 percent of each blogs score) and the data from the three social media components (which accounted for the remaining 50 percent). The blogs with the highest total scores made the cut. While the list didnt change dramatically from last year, there were a few notable differences. The Kitchn made a leap from number six up to number two, and Picky Palate jumped from number 12 up to number five on our list. Skinnytaste , which ranked third last year, fell to number 10 this year, and David Lebovitz , whose star just keeps rising, jumped from number 11 up to number six. Simply Recipes held onto the top spot for the fourth year in a row. There were also several newcomers, while others fell off the list entirely. This year we welcome Bakers Royale , Chocolate & Zucchini , Elanas Pantry , Food52 , Gluten-Free Girl and the Chef , Simple Bites , and Thug Kitchen to our list, while we say goodbye to Annies Eats , Gluten-Free Goddess, Mommys Kitchen , Our Best Bites , Pinch My Salt, TasteSpotting , and A Year of Slow Cooking. Falling off our list in no way indicates a drop in quality; reasons vary from blog to blog. Some have slowed down the rate of posting entries; others have simply been surpassed by other blogs in traffic. The blogs on our list offer everything from recipes to breaking restaurant news to simple musings about life and food, but theyre all worthy of being on your radar if you love food.

Last year alone nearly 75 new restaurants opened. Now Followill’s older brothers, Caleb and Nathan the foodies of the band are able to easily rattle off favorite Nashville eateries Husk, The Catbird Seat, Rolf & Daughters, City House and Bailey’s restaurant, Silly Goose, places that aren’t just great locally, but known nationally. And that has the players on the city’s music scene lending a hand to spread the word that good eats have arrived. Bands and artists like Kings of Leon, Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys and even Taylor Swift have been talking up the city’s fine restaurants and neighborhood favorites in national publications. And last month, the Followill brothers brought in top chefs from the Food Network, New York and Los Angeles to serve their creations alongside local restaurants and chefs at the band’s inaugural Music City Eats festival. “So now the theme has changed, now it’s a celebration of Nashville,” Caleb Followill said of the festival. “Cause we have a lot of young, great chefs that are trying to do something special and I want Nashville to become one of the Southern food meccas that it has potential to be.” City House’s Tandy Wilson, a Tennessee native who creates delicious Italian pastas and pizzas with Southern ingredients, said having musicians as regular customers fits into his style of dining. “It’s kinda opened some doors to a little bit of friendship and you figure out that we’re not all that different,” Wilson said. “I find a lot of these guys we can have the same conversations. When they go to a different city, they go eat somewhere. They want to talk about that.

Musicians Play up Nashville Food Scene

While You Slept, This Woman Took Selfies in the Plane Lavatory

More than half of the nations 1.8million core fast-food workers rely on the federal safety net to make ends meet, the reports said. Together, they collect nearly $1.9billion through the earned income tax credit, $1billion in food stamps and $3.9billion through Medicaid and the Childrens Health Insurance Program, according to a report by economists at the University of California at Berkeleys Labor Center and the University of Illinois. More business news No clear plan to avoid default as deal collapses Lori Montgomery and Paul Kane After a House plan to end the shutdown and raise the debt ceiling loses support of conservatives, Senate leaders return to negotiations days before a key deadline. Feds taper gets pushback from abroad Howard Schneider As the U.S. central bank is expected to wind down its stimulus policies in coming months, the world is nervous. As U.S. faces potential downgrades, markets flash alarm Zachary A. Goldfarb Fitch warned it could strip the U.S. of its AAA rating as investors signaled their concern over the debt limit. More business news Overall, the core fast-food workers are twice as likely to rely on public assistance than workers in other fields, said one of the reports, which examined nonmanagerial fast-food employees who work at least 11 hours a week and 27 weeks a year. Even among the 28 percent of fast-food workers who were on the job 40 hours a week, the report said, more than half relied on the federal safety net to get by. These statistics paint a picture of workers not being able to get their fair share of the largest, richest economy in the world, said Sylvia A. Allegretto, lead author of the report by the university economists, which was paid for by Fast Food Forward, a group that supports walkouts by fast-food workers. It is a good thing that we have these work supports, but they should be a last resort. Those workers are left to rely on the public safety net even though the nations seven largest publicly traded fast-food companies netted a combined $7.4billion in profits last year, while paying out $53million in salaries to their top executives and distributing $7.7billion to shareholders, according to the second report, by the National Employment Law Project, a worker advocacy group. Fast-food industry representatives disputed the findings.