Manufacturing In New York Area Cools As Sales, Hiring Slow

Alleged al Qaeda operative Al Libi taken to New York week after capture in Libya

“The reason this is happening is because of a poorly written law originally designed to stop slumlords from running illegal hotels with dozens of rental apartments,” Mishelle writes. “As a New Yorker just trying to pay my bills, I don’t understand why they think I’m a slumlord.” “I figure that if we get 20,000 people to sign the petition, we’ll get the state Senate’s attention,” she continues. “If we hit that goal by October 20th, I pledge to deliver the signatures to every senator myself.” As of this writing the petition has surpassed 20,000 signatures, the majority of which were gathered within the last 24 hours. Airbnb also got behind the petition on Monday by sending out an e-mail to its thousands of New York members. “The New York attorney general has subpoenaed the records of almost all of our New York hosts,” Airbnb’s global head of community Douglas Atkin wrote in the e-mail. “We are fighting the subpoena with all we’ve got, but poorly written laws make for even worse enforcement, and unless you help to stop it once and for all, the laws may never get better and New Yorkers will continue to suffer.” The debacle between New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and Airbnb has been ongoing over the past year, but it got heated when Schneiderman filed a subpoena earlier this month. The subpoena requests three years’ worth of data on thousands of Airbnb New York hosts. Airbnb has said that it has 225,000 community members in New York. The Attorney General’s office is specifically looking for data on 15,000 hosts — it’s unclear if this includes almost all of Airbnb’s New York hosts. While Airbnb has said that it will cooperate with New York’s lawmakers to root out illegal hotel operators and slumlords, it also filed a motion last week stating the subpoena was “unreasonably broad” and it won’t turn over sweeping amounts of information on hosts who have done no wrong. Schneiderman’s subpoena is based on a 2011 New York state law that makes it illegal for New York residents to rent out a property for less than 29 days. The law is meant to protect renters, so that slumlords don’t force them to leave to make a quick buck on unlicensed hotels and short-term stays. After the petition popped up and Airbnb sent out its e-mail to New York members on Monday, a spokesman from Schneiderman’s office accused the service of fear mongering, according to the Wall Street Journal . Airbnb is “scaring and misleading thousands of well-intentioned New Yorkers and sending lobbyists to Albany to create legal loopholes,” spokesman Matt Mittenthal told the Journal. Airbnb and the New York Attorney General’s office did not immediately respond to CNET’s request for comment.

‘Humans of New York’ fascinate photographer Brandon Stanton

humans of new york

Now that Capital is close to filling up its reporter ranks on the politics and media desks, editors are lining up several weekly city columnists for the site’s early November relaunch. Capital’s first three columnists will be Jim Windolf, a Vanity Fair contributing editor who has written for several publications and started the New York Observer’s “New York World” column; Joanna Molloy, a veteran Daily News gossip writer and co-author of a new book on the subject; and Glynnis MacNicol, a writer and co-founder of TheLi.st and former media editor at Business Insider and Mediaite. The model will be more Jimmy Breslin than Joe Scarborough. While Politico columnists, like Scarborough or National Review editor Rich Lowry, comment on political and policy debates, Capital’s writers will produce reported columns that also express a point of view. They’ll draw from the city columnist tradition that extends from tabloid muckraking, a la Breslin, to the New York Times’ Clyde Haberman. Capital co-editor Tom McGeveran told HuffPost the new columns will focus on “New York issues, New York personalities and New York places.” “This is a tradition in which the best columns always entertain,” McGeveran said. “Sometimes they even change the minds of the city’s big decision makers; better yet is when a columnist changes their plans.” The new columnists are not joining full-time, but will write weekly for the site. However, Capital has been filling up the newsroom with full-time reporters and editors since Politico purchased the three-year-old site in September. On the politics front, Capital’s hired Daily News veteran Joanne Wasserman , the Albany Times Union’s Jimmy Vielkind , the New York Post’s Sally Goldenberg . Capital media reporter Joe Pompeo will now be joined on the desk by several additional reporters, including TV Newser’s Alex Weprin, Women’s Wear Daily’s Matthew Lynch, former Newsday and Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Nicole Levy, and World Policy Journal’s Johana Bhuiyan. In addition, Peter Sterne will cover media part-time for the site while finishing at Columbia University. Follow Michael Calderone on Twitter: www.twitter.com/mlcalderone FOLLOW MEDIA

New York and its colorful populace have proved irresistible to Stanton, 29, who made his way to the city three years ago after losing his job as a bond trader in Chicago. He has photographed about 5,000 New Yorkers of every age, every ethnic background, in every imaginable outfit (and usually in broad daylight). What started as a hobby became a passion and a profession, after he nearly starved the first year, he admits. “New York has the biggest, most eclectic collection of people in the world,” says the affable Stanton, whose work found a distinctive edge when he began talking to his subjects. Brandon Stanton in his element, photographing the ”Humans of New York.’ (Photo: John Berube) His photos are accompanied by little stories. “It’s become much more of a storytelling blog than a photography blog,” says Stanton, who looks for people he can talk to, often sitting on benches, or walking alone. Conversations can last from 15 seconds to 10 minutes, but, he says, “When I hear my caption, I know it.” One day he shot an old man in a wheelchair his wild white hair and beard forming a pillowy halo around his intense face. The caption: “I look like God, don’t I”? Stanton takes his Canon EOS 5D Mark III out in the city every day, averaging about six portraits. He likes the subway (“there’s always interesting stuff going on down there,” he laughs) and especially parks, with Central Park a frequent backdrop. About one out of every three potential subjects declines to be photographed, but many happily share a secret sliver of themselves. His favorite kind of human? Kids.

Capital New York Hires Three Columnists As Relaunch Nears

Survey Results Octobers estimates for the so-called Empire State index in the Bloomberg survey of 51 economists ranged from minus 2 to 10. The headline reading is a separate question rather than a compilation of subcomponents and is therefore sometimes considered a gauge of underlying sentiment. The measure of new orders increased in October to 7.8, the highest since March, from 2.4 the previous month. A gauge of shipments declined to 13.1 from a 16-month high of 16.4 in September. Factory managers said inventories were little changed this month after climbing in September for the first time in more than a year. Stronger orders and weaker inventories is not exactly a bad combination for the production outlook, Neil Dutta, head of U.S. economics at Renaissance Macro Research LLC in New York, said in a report. The index of prices paid was little changed at 21.7 compared with 21.5, while prices received decreased to 2.4 from 8.6. A measure of factory employment weakened to 3.6 from 7.5. Factory executives in the New York Fed region viewed the future with a bit more optimism. The barometer of their outlook six months from now rose to 40.8, the highest since April 2012, from 40.6.

U.S. Market Should Be Part of a Portfolio: Shiller

American officials have described him as “one of the world’s most wanted terrorists.” He was indicted in 2001 by the federal court in the Southern District of New York in the embassy bombings and in connection with his alleged roles in al Qaeda conspiracies to attack U.S. forces in Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Somalia. Some terrorism experts have questioned how much valuable intelligence al Libi would be able to provide for his captors. A former jihadist associate told CNN last week that it was unlikely that he was still playing an active role with the terrorist network. His wife said he was no longer a member of al Qaeda, had been living a normal life and was seeking a job with the Libyan oil ministry. Al Libi was captured October 5 on the street in front of his home as he returned in his car from morning prayers. President Barack Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder have previously said they prefer to try individuals such as al Libi in American courts. Trying such suspects on American soil has been a controversial topic in the past. In 2009, Holder said five detainees with alleged ties to the September 11, 2001, attacks would be transferred from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to New York for trial in civilian court. Later Holder reversed course, announcing that accused 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and others would be tried in a military commission at Guantanamo instead. State Department deputy spokeswoman Marie Harf said last week that there was no chance that al Libi would end up at Guantanamo.