Roger Richman Dies At 69; Agent Represented Celebrity Estates

The Celebrity Multi-Family Office

Instead they brought their joy to the streets with 75 pianos around Boston and Cambridge for the public to use as they wish through Monday, October 14. The Celebrity Series of Boston Kickoff party offered live performances and an impromptu music session on a couple of those artfully-designed pianos while a montage of the series greatest moments played on Saturday, October 5. Skillful musicians played and sang from a wide variety of music genres, anything from planned performances to a little piano improvisation. All were welcome to play. Guests enjoyed a selection of wine, a Ben and Jerrys ice cream bar, and delectable desserts from Davios . The reception took place inside the Galleria, 10 Saint James Street in Boston. The new season has begun and upcoming performances include acclaimed pianist Yuja Wang playing works by Stravinsky, Chopin, and Prokofiev on Friday, October 18 at New England Conservatorys Jordan Hall at 8 p.m. Returning mandolinist Chris Thile rounds out the weekend with sonatas, his own compositions, and his contemporary music on Sunday, October 20 at the Sanders Theatre at 7 p.m. Other live performances include the extensive, extraordinary works of composer Harold Arlen with What Makes it Great with Rob Kapilow Over the Rainbow: The Songs of Harold Arlen . The evening pays tribute to Harold Arlens Broadway and timeless songs such as Stormy Weather, Ive Got the World on A String and much more performed by singing trio Rob Kapilow , Rebecca Luker , and Michael Winther at New England Conservatory’s Jordan Hall. Visit www.celebrityseries.org for the wide range of performances in store for the 2013-2014 season!

Celebrity chef joins forces with WWF to promote responsible seafood

Richman helped usher in a state law allowing heirs of the rich and famous to control the use of their loved one’s images. Roger Richman in his office in 1993 with images of clients W.C. Fields and Marilyn Monroe. Richman was instrumental in getting the 1985 California Celebrity Rights Act passed. (Los Angeles Times / October 14, 2013) Also By Steve Chawkins October 14, 2013, 8:34 p.m. Agent Roger Richman had a ton of celebrity clients James Cagney, Mae West, Maria Callas, Albert Einstein, the Marx brothers, Sigmund Freud, Gypsy Rose Lee and W.C. Fields, to name a few. Contrary to expectations, none of them were overly demanding. “I don’t have people calling me in the middle of the night saying there aren’t enough red M&Ms in the Green Room,” he told The Times in a 2001 interview. The reason was simple: By the time he began advocating for them, they were long dead. Richman, who represented the heirs of the rich and famous and fought successfully for a California law giving them the right to control the use of their loved ones’ images, died Oct.

Notable deaths of 2013

One example of this is the celebrity multi-family office, which is designed to meet the needs and wants of highly successful entertainers and athletes. Celebrities can especially benefit from the coordinated approach, characteristic of a multi-family office, explains Richard Flynn, principal with the Rothstein Kass family office group . Of course, the staff must be expert at overseeing the integration of investment management, advanced planning, private investment banking, business strategy, and related support services. While most high-profile successes appear to have a charmed life, there is usually an intense back-story filled with frustrations and anxieties that cannot be overlooked. Even when they have achieved levels of fame and fortune long sought in our culture, most celebrities find their status has its drawbacks. Were all familiar with the stories about bankruptcy and overspending in show business, says Hannah Shaw Grove, executive editor of Private Wealth magazine and principal of the boutique consultancy HSGrove . Most entertainers and celebrities have a limited window in which they can earn consistently high incomes, so they need a strong team of professionals around them to help protect and leverage their assets into something greater. Athletes dont fare much better. Every move an athlete makes is observed, analyzed, and frequently second-guessed by coaches, managers, teammates, fans, and members of the press. Since a great number of people and organizations, such as sports federations and commercial sponsors, rely on winning athletes to generate revenue, its understandable that most athletes feel the pressure and are afraid of failure. Celebrities seeking a financial advisory relationship are increasingly attracted to the multi-family office model, which integrates select core aspects of a business managers job with a broad array of financial and legal expertise. According to Miguel Forbes , vice chairman of the Forbes Family Trust, Successful entertainers and athletes are turning to multi-family offices, who can help them navigate their financial worlds and are nimble enough to offer business strategy and support services specific to them. Celebrity multi-family offices offer a broad array of expertise, including advanced planning, which is a suite of cutting-edge services that help wealthy individuals and families structure their assets to be as tax-effective and secure as possible. According to Frank Seneco, president of Seneco & Associates , The ability of entertainers, for example, to leverage their loan-out corporations can prove extremely profitable. Advisors in multi-family offices can also offer business strategy and support, handling licensing agreements or business ventures with the celebrities names attached and helping them capitalize on their success to generate significant monies. All too often, less knowledgeable advisors will let celebrities not well versed in these areas dive into business deals with a very limited chance of success. When celebrities call on advisors to develop a business model, it means the advisors must go beyond the role of a traditional multi-family office, business manager, or management consultant, because theyre tackling the clients financial and tax issues all along the way, explains Flynn.

Celebrity Series of Boston trades candles for pianos for dynamic 75th season (Video)

As a publicly-known chef and restaurateur, Im in a unique position to help educate fellow seafood retailers and consumers on how their choices can help transform the fishing industry for the better, said Bobby. As a personal commitment to the cause, Bobby introduced a responsible seafood menu at his restaurant using responsibly-sourced products from seafood companies that comply with best management practices in seafood production, some of which have been certified by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) and Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC). Dwindling fish stocks Unsustainable fishing practices are causing tremendous stress on the regions marine resources, brought about by increasing seafood demand from around the world. Destructive fishing methods are still rampant in some parts of Asia Pacific and are rapidly destroying critical coral reef ecosystems. Without urgent transformative measures from fishing companies, seafood retailers, and consumers, fish stocks will continue to decline and we may not have enough fish resources left in the near future to secure our food and livelihood, said Ngo Tien Chuong, WWF-Vietnams Aquaculture Coordinator. Improving fisheries WWF has been working closely with the private and public sectors to help improve fishing practices through fisheries and aquaculture improvement projects that help fisheries adopt better management practices, and assisting them to eventually attain MSC and ASC certification. In Vietnam, for example, WWF helped the clam fishery in Ben Tre to be the first in Southeast Asia to get MSC certification in 2009, increasing its export price by as much as 50 per cent. In line with the governments goal to attain responsible pangasius production, WWF has also been working with pangasius exporting companies and has helped the industry achieve its first target of having 10 per cent of its total production ASC certified in 2012. An additional 15 per cent is expected by the end of 2013. These two sustainably certified seafood products are on Bobby Chins menu. This is a new model of cooperation and we hope that it will multiply and be applied to other industries in Vietnam. The success of this model will help Vietnamese industries, especially fisheries and aquaculture, to achieve its target toward sustainable development, said Ms.